Czech Grammar

Czech Grammar

Level A1 - C2

Contains: Grammar | Phrases | Reading materials and more

One of the more complicated languages to learn but made at least fun with DuoTrainin. This is a complete online course covering all levels and topics such as Verbs, Cases and Past tenses.

Available via: English

Prices from: 2.50 € / Month *





Learn Czech Grammar online

The Duotrainin Learn Czech Grammar course is the perfect for those who are starting out learning the language or for those who already some knowledge of the Czech language.

Learn the essential parts of Czech grammar, including sentence structure, cases, tenses, etc. Work at your own pace while questions are generated according to your personal level. Our wide variety of topics covers all levels, from A1 to C2. Your learning process is enhanced through explanations and sound samples.

The Czech Grammar course contains a large library of reading materials that have been written in an easy to understand way and is ideal for people who want to learn Czech grammar online.

Duotrainin has a free learn Czech course where you do a limited number of free Czech grammar tests and questions, but you can try the full version for 7 days free of charge.

Below you can find a quick guide to Czech Grammar in a way that a non academic person can understand.


Nouns are the words we use to represent people, things, places or concepts. For example – Kate, dog, woman, house, beauty, law.
In English, nouns do not change their form or spelling according to where they are positioned in a sentence. However in the Czech language there are three important grammatical factors that determine the spelling of a Czech noun - the case (position in the sentence), the gender and if the noun is soft or hard .

Czech Grammar nominative case - nouns

When the noun is the subject of the sentence, we say that it is in the nominative case. (the person or thing is performing the action of the verb) ie - The cat chased the mouse (in this sentence, the cat is performing the action of the verb so it is in the nominative case). The Nominative spelling is what you find in the dictionary.

Other Nominative areas covered in the course are:
Nominative - Personal pronouns
Nominative - Possessive pronouns
Nominative - adjectives

Czech Grammar accusative case - nouns

When the noun is the direct object of the action of the verb, we say that it is in the accusative case. ie - The cat chased the mouse (in this sentence, the mouse is receiving the action of the verb so it must be in the accusative case.). In Czech, the accusative spelling of the noun is different to that of the nominative (what you find in the dictionary)

Other Accusative areas covered in the course are:
Accusative - Personal pronouns
Accusative - Possessive pronouns
Accusative - adjectives

Czech Grammar genitive case - nouns

The Genitive case is used when there is a sense of ownership or possession connected to the noun, for example, I liked the colour of the wine.
In this case I is the subject of the sentence, Like is the verb and Colour is the direct object (it is receiving the action of the verb). The word that is left is wine. The noun wine has to be in the Genitive case.

Other Genitive areas covered in the course are:
Genitive - Personal pronouns
Genitive - Possessive pronouns
Genitive - adjectives